I don’t enjoy webloggers writing about writing their weblogs, yet I am about to do so. I doubt I’d read this weblog; it’s hardly compelling. I have some feelings about the President and about dealing with criminals; your own sentiments will be far more interesting to you. I often make my own lunch; who cares? …
" /> Jason Holborn | Cybercarnet/Weblog - Web-Spinning and Web-Logging

Web-Spinning and Web-Logging

I don’t enjoy webloggers writing about writing their weblogs, yet I am about to do so.

I doubt I’d read this weblog; it’s hardly compelling. I have some feelings about the President and about dealing with criminals; your own sentiments will be far more interesting to you. I often make my own lunch; who cares? So I write in French (like a 13-year old) and watch (and overthink) a lot of movies; big deal.

I never wanted to have a weblog; Kaleb (J. Barker, my webmaster) talked me into it. I’m glad that he did, as I find I do like having it. I like to write about whatever strikes my fancy without any specific theme, and I have to focus on positive aspects or angles, or, at minimum, avoid outright negativity and cranking or whining. Having this weblog channels my attention towards more affirmative thinking and expression.

Still, I don’t want to waste my time on entries that nobody reads; it’s smarter to invest energy on more productive schemes. And, on the other hand, I don’t want a hundred comments about Barack Obama being the Perfect POTUS or the Anti-American-Anti-Christ, either.

Some think I ought to write purely on film-making, using this URL strictly as a promotional portfolio site.

I’m not a professional film-maker, much as I wish I were. I can’t imagine readers wanting to know my deep heartfelt thoughts on mise-en-scene (I have no deep heartfelt thoughts on it, anyway) or Sergei Eisenstein. Just today, I read some screenwriter’s weblog; I’m not linking to it or naming it (because my thoughts are negative). He holds screenwriting classes of some kind in his city and has a weblog full of posts regarding, “The Vitality of the Maximum 28 Word Logline” and “The Element All Midpoints Must Have”, and many, many more. Speaking frankly, who cares what this un-produced screenwriter you’ve never heard of thinks??? I know a working, produced screenwriter (it’s Jamie Nash) who is too busy with meetings and deals about future productions to write entries like these, and besides that, I bet $5 he’s sold or optioned work that had a 29 or 31 word logline. And besides “being a turning point”, I find it a stretch to think that all midpoints have any must-have element in common. It’s tough believe that Alfred Hitchcock or Akira Kurasawa or Francois Truffaut ever thought there was, either.

I could write about filmmakers and new (and already existing) movies, yet I can’t think of why anyone would be that interested. I wouldn’t care to read what Steven Spielberg or Todd Haynes or Kathryn Bigelow think or feel about other filmmakers or other movies. Why would I as a reader on-line care about what I have to say about such topics?

The idea that R2-D2 is the protagonist of STAR WARS is pretty fun to me; I could write about that, and maybe I will. I don’t want to write only about movies and especially about “movie analysis” all the time, though. I don’t want to do movie reviews; maybe I should, though. I dislike most movie reviews, so finding some way to review movies that satisfies me could be a neat challenge. Yet, I’m with Jan Zwicky on one thing: I’d rather use space to talk up something that deserves attention than waste the space to diss something which I’m telling you doesn’t deserve your attention.

I definitely do NOT want to write about “politics” (at least, not in any partisan “left vs right” way) yet some issues (world federation/world parliament, or restorative justice, or female leadership, or the problem of partisanship attract my attention. Everyone’s attention is drawn by certain issues; I don’t want to be defined by my attention’s intrigues. Few things bore-yet-rile-me like “political weblogs”. I want to pay attention and be aware, yet have a life, too.

I like to take a photo of a meal I feel good about, though I can’t imagine anyone would be interested. I’ve read other weblogs, believe me, about other people’s choices in caloric intake matters, and it’s not that interesting to me. My food is cool to me, yet no one else.

I guess I keep this weblog for myself; again, I like to use it to channel positive energies. I don’t want to be on-line bitching about how much I hate DComics’ new re-design of the Joker that I saw on-line, or a fellow shopper in NoFrills who annoyed me putting their bare grubby unwashed hands into the bulk buns bins (although I will take a moment to remark how surprised I am at how often this happens) (and will confess that I’m not above a fussy reprimand) (also I think that extreme germophobia is silly). I don’t photograph my dinner if it’s a Subway Veggie Delite sandwich, or a microwave pizza — I only do it if it’s something I feel really proud of eating, and want to record as a ritual to train myself to make pride-inducing eating decisions in the future. I want to talk about things that I like about Barack Obama, not things I dislike about him. It may be somewhat dishonest or false or untrue to not criticize the decisions of his I don’t agree with, yet I’m not in the Washington Post or in the West Wing, so really, who cares? I want this weblog to be a tool for myself and my thinking. If Barack Obama wants to know what I really think, my number’s on my homepage.

Ultimately, and bluntly, I think I’m just a lousy writer. Sure, I can string together incisive dialogue and, on my best days, a breathtaking climax. But an engrossing, must-read article? My favorite webloggers don’t write stories that engross me, sticking instead to articles that do, so I’m okay with the idea of being a lousy weblogger, I suppose.

I’m probably more interesting in person. Or am I…?