That’s, um, what they were invented for. Killing people. It’s like saying, “War doesn’t kill people”, when war is designed specifically to kill people. Don’t get me wrong: I dig guns and love to shoot them! If there’s anything I could possibly add to the debate about gun control, it’s just that people in cities …
" /> Jason Holborn | Cybercarnet/Weblog - Guns don't kill people - well, actually, yes, they do.

Guns don’t kill people — well, actually, yes, they do.

That’s, um, what they were invented for. Killing people. It’s like saying, “War doesn’t kill people”, when war is designed specifically to kill people.

Don’t get me wrong: I dig guns and love to shoot them!

If there’s anything I could possibly add to the debate about gun control, it’s just that people in cities and people in the country may need different gun controls. I am from a working corn and wheat farm in the boonies and I have lived in several downtown cores. When I hear people debating gun control, I feel like many are often oblivious to other realities. I have a friend (a two-time candidate for public office) who feels all guns should be outlawed. I believe he is sort of naive on this, although, even hearing my story about my dad firing on (and killing) a (large) dog threatening my mom (in the dark, late in the evening), even hearing that there is no local police force within a half hour’s drive, he is unmoved. I think he would feel differently if he were to live a few years in a more rural area than he is used to. I know other people in the country who think the idea of registering guns is lunatic and tantamount to a police state. And, I totally get where they are coming from, and I do not disagree. Yet, I’m sure that if they were to spend time living in a city, they would probably walk away agreeing that urban gun control is actually pretty important. (Also, these same guys will often criticize cities like Toronto as “dangerous” where “a person can get shot!”, in the same meal as they can insist that outlawing guns is stupid.)

City mice are city mice and country mice are country mice. People talk about “right and left”, or “liberals and conservatives”, or “French and English”, or “Latin and Anglo-Saxon”, or “East and West”, or “men and women”, and I’m often dubious about the distinctions. But there is a difference between “rural and urban”; they are different worlds and cultures, and perhaps there is room to legislate gun control differently in these different worlds.

A city person once told me that wherever there are guns, there is violence and murder. I come from an area where, literally, every single house has multiple guns inside it, and where there is next to no gun violence (apart from 2 suicides). We’re told before kindergarten that a gun is a tool of death and harm and must never, ever, under any circumstances, no matter what, be pointed at another person. This city person frowned in sober thought and pondered aloud to me, “Maybe guns are gods? Maybe we need to tell people, ‘The gun is a god’, so that they respect the gun?” That was exactly what I’d just said, but we all like to think we just invented a new idea.

I can’t explain it beyond “respect for the power of guns”, yet I feel that in general, gun control is working in rural areas (mind you, I only know of people with plain, regular, simple rifles and shotguns. No Bushmasters, no Uzis, no AK-47s. No pistols, no armor-piercing bullets). I’ve been at a downtown (just steps off of Yonge and Dundas Square) condo gathering where the host said, “Hey, wanna see my gun?” and pulled the heaviest handgun I’d ever seen out of his dresser drawer. Gun control isn’t really working in cities.

If you talked to the police chief in a lot of rural areas, I doubt he or she would have the concerns about “the guns out there” (in people’s possession) that a police chief in a city might express about “the guns out there”. Their “out there”‘s are different environments, different ecosystems, different worlds, different cultures. Maybe they could use different gun control laws.