I thought today, “Just ten more ’10 day blocks’ and I’ll be at a hundred”, although really, it’s not even an immense challenge anymore.  I can do it. Around 2007, I started saying that, “In twenty years, sugar will be the new cigarettes; little kids will look on today’s advertising and wonder what the heck …
" /> Jason Holborn | Cybercarnet/Weblog - Day 10 (Again): Days Without Sugar

Day 10 (Again): Days Without Sugar

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I thought today, “Just ten more ’10 day blocks’ and I’ll be at a hundred”, although really, it’s not even an immense challenge anymore.  I can do it.

Around 2007, I started saying that, “In twenty years, sugar will be the new cigarettes; little kids will look on today’s advertising and wonder what the heck we were thinking, and people will just shrug helplessly and say, ‘We didn’t know,’ and something cigarette-like-ish will happen, be it regulation and warning labels, or class-action lawsuits (or, maybe, both)”.  A lot of people still think that’s a little crazy; Robert Priddle shared this article that begins, “The first people in America to say smoking was bad for your health were greeted with derision and called quacks.”  (The article projects potential “big tobacco-like” lawsuits for “big food”.)

Scientists may discover that diabetes’s cause is heavy metals in the air, and that tooth decay is a result of fluoride.  I could be wrong about sugar (heck, I’m not even a scientist).   Yet if nothing else, I’m saving money.  Around 2008 (maybe 2007, maybe 2009) I starting telling myself, when staring at arrays of chocolate bars, that I wasn’t going to pay any large corporations money to poison me.  If nothing else, I hoped I’d change my mental habit of justifying stopping off at the dollar store to pick up two or three or four (which I frequently did daily).  Today, I’m not buying ice-cream, chocolate syrup, raspberry jam, Froot Loops, chocolate eclairs, cream puffs, McFlurries, or any white or brown sugar.  Even if health concerns are discovered one day to be invalid in regards to sugar, I’ll still be reaping a (financial) benefit in quitting.

The article mentions Robert Lustig in great detail; it even links to his viral lecture called “Sugar: The Bitter Truth” (which I saw around 2006 or 2007) (jeepers I’ve been quitting sugar for a long time), which I am not able to embed here today.  It’s long and lacks special effects and guns and love-scenes and award-winning scoring, yet I still recommend watching it sometime.

I wouldn’t give my kids sugar, ever.

I wouldn’t object if they ate it at other homes, or at events outside the home, or wherever.  I don’t think there’s anything wrong at all with sugar in moderation (I just didn’t eat it in moderation).

And if they don’t eat it at home, they’re not going to be all that enamored with it.  Everything’s so over-sugared these days that, having gone off, I don’t even like many of the treats I used to enjoy any longer.  There’s better, smarter, wiser rewards and treats; we all know that.

It’s hard to quit sugar; it’s easier to just not start your kids on it.  They’ll thank you.  I know it would have felt a little frustrating at a certain time to know that all the other kids had bags of brown sugar and jugs of root beer at home, and that I/we didn’t.  I would have gotten over that certain time.  My schoolmate Judy Radstake was never allowed television; at all.  Probably it made her curious and a little frustrated at one certain time (maybe not), but if so, she got over it and believe me, she didn’t mind.  It was a simple, matter-of-fact thing, and I always sensed that she preferred it that way, anyway.  I’d lay a hundred dollars that she could tell she wasn’t missing out on anything at all.